Hamstring PMFR

Hamstring PMFR

It is recommended to have support under foot for the leg receiving MFR; in addition, the opposite leg should be folded up and out if possible. Clients may perform small or large movements; with deep or shallow pressure.

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Hip Flexor PMFR

Hip Flexor PMFR

Include upper / lateral Quad, and front-lateral area of hip (location of Tensor Fascia Lata muscle). Clients may think of where 'front pocket' is and as long as they don't target bony prominences, they will succeed. The use of other…

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Low Back PMFR

Low Back PMFR

All 4's is the safest and mildest way to begin clients loosening each others tight lower backs. They can roll over the PSIS's if they want, with no harm done. Include upper Gluteal area as well as 'kidney' areas (which…

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Neck PMFR

Neck PMFR

Start really gently with any neck MFR! Initial connective tissue hypersensitivity may mean sharp pain for the receiver, if you don't take it slowly to begin with. Use more of a "pulling" motion than a pushing motion; try and keep…

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Pec PMFR

Pec PMFR

Will target Pec Major and Minor, and uses the client's own body to generate force and momentum for the release. Ensure the Posture Pro pushes the shoulder firmly to the ground to begin the release technique - this is key.

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Shoulder PMFR

Shoulder PMFR

Never comfortable, but essential for improving Glenohumeral range of motion in the overhead press. Excellent for relieving impingement symptoms on any press movement.

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Thoracic PMFR

Thoracic PMFR

Rolling up and own Thoracic spine is excellent for muscle release and activation. Vertical oscillations for joint mobility may be done with partners consent, and starting carefully only do on the stiff section of the Thoracic spine.

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